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Collateral Damage

Collateral Damage is a news and chat show produced by KDHX Community Media in St. Louis, MO dealing with local and state politics, how national issues affect the region and what role the media plays in determining how reality is perceived in Metro Saint Louis. Veteran journalist D.J. Wilson is your host and guests include members of the mainstream media as well as bloggers, politicians and activists.
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Collateral Damage is a news and chat show produced by KDHX Community Media in St. Louis, MO dealing with local and state politics, how national issues affect the region and what role the media plays in determining how reality is perceived in Metro Saint Louis. Veteran journalist D.J. Wilson is your host and guests include members of the mainstream media as well as bloggers, politicians and activists.

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Feb 20, 2018

While Hank reads much of these bios within the show, it's worth checking out the full bios of both Ronald and Hattie Jackson (Click on each name to read more about their backgrounds).

From civil rights to poverty to education to black empowerment, the Jackson's have spent their lives fighting for those in need.

As Hank likes to say, these are, undoubtedly, two of St Louis' Finest.

Hank Thompson with Hattie Jackson and Ronald Jackson

Here's a glance at how the conversation went:

Chapter 1. Background and inspiration for a lifetime of dedicated and disciplined activism and work. (0:00-11:30)

Chapter 2.  A power-couple is formed. (11:30-16:45)

Chapter 3. Understanding the difference between internal and external control. If you're poor, the world seems to control you. With enough socioeconomic capital, you can have the confidence that comes from your own, internal control of yourself and the world around you. (16:45-24:00)

Chapter 4. Convincing children that they could. "I want excellence [from students] because that's how I made it out of poverty." (24:00-28:00)

Chapter 5.  "Being poor is hard as hell," explains Ronald. "Unpredictability in life has a powerful influence on people." (28:00-32:30)

Chapter 6. A common theme: Children. "Children respond to parental expectations" (33:00-39:30)

Chapter 7. 1,000 Ron & Haddie Jacksons, PLUS a special recounting of putting her life on the line during the civil rights movement of the 60's to integrate an Alabama theater. (39:45-50:30)

You can also catch guest host Hank Thompson on the air Sunday nights at 6pm on 88.7 WSIE.

If you're wondering why Hank seems to be talking to a character named Andy, that would be Andy Heaslet, the show's engineer who joins the host and his guests in-studio each week.

*Hope you're back on your feet soon, DJ Wilson!*

Feb 13, 2018

As the City of St Louis' website explains, "Judge Edwards earned an undergraduate degree in 1978 and a law degree in 1982 from St. Louis University. He rose through private and public legal positions to the legal staff of Southwestern Bell Telephone Company in 1990. From there he was appointed to the St. Louis Circuit Court. He was the Administrative Judge of the Family Court and Chief Juvenile Court Judge from 2007 to 2012."

Edwards was appointed as Public Safety Director by Mayor Krewson in the fall of 2017.

Hank Thompson with Public Safety Director Judge Jimmie Edwards

Here's a glance at how the conversation went:

Chapter 1. "It's what you do for others that matters most." How Edwards came to be a judge appointed to the distinguished role of Public Safety Director. (0:00-8:15)

Chapter 2.  Judge Edwards says he has "High expectations... for all of the 3600 people that work for [him]..." and they're not the only ones; Judge Edwards has earned respect from police and "crooks" alike. (8:15-11:30)

Chapter 3. "Our City is basically safe." While this may be the case, Judge Edwards understands that we "have to be smarter about how we utilize our [police] officers," if we want citizens to feel safe. (11:30-19:15)

Chapter 4. But 205 murders last year! The public must be a part of public safety and this will require courage from citizens. (19:15-24:15)

Chapter 5.  Edwards envisions "A community where your grandkids can walk to the corner store without the fear of being hurt." When it comes to better crime fighting, Edwards says, "It is my job to root out the bad police officers, but I also need help from the police officers on the inside." Similarly, he needs the support of the community to keep criminals off the streets. (24:15-29:00)

Chapter 6. "We're not going to incarcerate our way out of crime" in our communities. Plus a surprising reality-check looking at white-on-white vs black-on-black crimes. (29:00-34:30)

Chapter 7. Dating back to the Dred Scott trial held here, the City of St Louis has been on the cutting edge of changing America and Edwards sees us as continuing to lead when it come to police relations as well. At the end of the day, "Reducing Crime is [Edwards'] number one goal..." and it's what he knows best. (34:30-41:20)

You can also catch guest host Hank Thompson on the air Sunday nights at 6pm on 88.7 WSIE.

Andy Heaslet is the show's engineer.

*Wishing you well, DJ Wilson!*

Hank Thompson with Judge Jimmie Edwards

Jan 30, 2018

Alderwomen Green, according to the website that bears her name, "first was elected in represent the 15th Ward in a Special Election in October of 2014 and was later re-elected in March of 2016."

"Since assuming office, her bio continues, "Alderwoman Green has become the progressive champion of St. Louis, fighting for a $15 minimum wage, civilian oversight of our police department, reproductive rights for women, and responsible development with community benefits. She has been an outspoken supporter of the Black Lives Matter movement to address racial disparities that exist within the St. Louis Community, and nation. She also currently sits on the Continuum of Care to end homelessness in the St. Louis Region."

Hank Thompson with Alderwoman Megan Green

Here's a glance at how the conversation went:

Chapter 1. It can be scary, standing up to bullies. How Megan became an activist and politician. (0:00-7:30)

Chapter 2. "What if we invested in the people who live here?" imagines Green. "We could grow the next fortune 500 company" instead of hoping to recruit a silver bullet company to come and save us. (7:30-12:15)

Chapter 3. Green knows who got her elected and those are the same folks who hold her accountable in her quest to push for progressive policies.  (12:15-21:00)

Chapter 4. "The power comes from us working together." Green discusses playing a role in elevating women and people of color in the St Louis political scene. (21:00-29:15)

Chapter 5. A different look at crime. "Your budget is your values statement," says Green; she thinks we should be spending more to help people rather than criminalizing them. (29:15-39:00)

Chapter 6. What makes young progressives tick? "We're about the work," explains Green in a closing conversation that covers the city-county merger, racial bridge building, theories of change, and a final look at what makes St Louis a great place to live. (39:00-48:30)

You can also catch guest host Hank Thompson on the air Sunday nights at 6pm on 88.7 WSIE.

You may have heard Hank chatting with an Andy during the course of the show - that would be Andy Heaslet, the show's engineer.

*Wishing you well, DJ Wilson!*

Jan 23, 2018

Jamala Rogers, according to the website bearing her name, grew up in a working class neighborhood Kansas City, MO, coming "of political and cultural age during the tumultuous 60’s...  She’s been organizing and raising hell ever since."

"Jamala currently resides in St. Louis, MO where she has devoted all of her adult life to creating a child-centered, family-oriented community–one that embraces, celebrates and protects human rights for all citizens regardless of race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation or religion... 

"Jamala is a featured columnist for the award-winning St. Louis American newspaper [this is her 25th year]... and is on the editorial boards of BlackCommentator.com and The Black Scholar. She has authored many articles for both local and national publications on issues that she is passionately involved in."

Rogers is married to legendary St Louis activist Percy Green and is one of the founders of the Organization for Black Struggle (OBS). OBS is celebrating its 38th anniversary on Saturday Jan 27, 2018.

Hank Thompson with Jamala Rogers
Here's a glance at how the conversation went:

Chapter 1. A 15 minute introduction crammed into 5. (0:00-5:00)

Chapter 2. Not asking for permission.  Hank asks Jamala how she came to be a leader in the black community. (5:00-11:45)

Chapter 3. Malcom X or Dr. King? Garvey or DuBois? Green or Rogers? Getting to systemic change isn't an either/or proposition.  (11:45-16:45)

Chapter 4. Bringing along people to help them learn about empowerment. Not everyone understands the reasoning behind protests, Rogers asks you to imagine the society we're trying to create. (16:45-26:00)

Chapter 5. The fight for local control of the St Louis City Police Dept. After a 30 year fight, this may be one of the brightest feathers in Rogers' cap. (26:15-31:00)

Chapter 6. Protest vs Activist vs Organizer. You should have seen Jamala glaring at Hank over her glasses when he described her as never having been loud. "I can get loud if I need to," she retorted. (31:00-43:00)

Chapter 7. Highs, lows, and legacies. The first black mayor in St Louis, Reggie Clemons, Frankie Freeman, and what lies ahead for Rogers. (43:00-51:00

You can also catch guest host Hank Thompson on the air Sunday nights at 6pm on 88.7 WSIE.

Andy Heaslet engineered the show.

*Our thoughts and prayers are with you, DJ Wilson!*

Jan 9, 2018

According to his bio, Mike Claiborne is "a 30-year market veteran, including more than 10 years at KMOX, has done pre- and post-game shows for the St. Louis Cardinals and the St. Louis Blues over the years."

Mike shares great stories about Cardinals heroes including Bob Gibson, Willie McGee, Mike Shannon, and Tommy Pham. But he also talks about what it was like growing- and coming-up in St Louis.
Mike Claiborne with Hank Thompson
 
Here's a glance at how the conversation went:

Chapter 1. "Volunteered to take a pay-cut..." Mike has been a staple on St Louis sports radio for 30 years and he's paid his dues. (0:00-13:00)

Chapter 2. Black men in the big leagues and in the booth.  (13:00-22:22)

Chapter 3. Is KMOX really "The Voice" of St Louis? (22:30-27:30)

Chapter 4.  Drinks with Bob Gibson and Willie McGee lead to a memorable story. (27:30-31:30)

Chapter 5. "Make sure you take care of the next guy." An invaluable lesson learned from the legendary Mike Shannon.  (31:30-38:00)

Chapter 6. A broader look at the state of the African American community today.  (39:00-45:15

You can also catch guest host Hank Thompson on the air Sunday nights at 6pm on 88.7 WSIE.

*Get well soon, DJ Wilson!*

Dec 19, 2017

Liner notes from the album, When Lions Roar read: "Classrooms & clubs, symphony & social halls, workshops & record shops... all are part of the Bosman's dossier of elegance... in pursuit of their aim: 'educate to elevate.'" - Dr. Eugene Redmond

This is one of the liveliest conversations featured on Collateral Damage in some time. You'll get a sneak peak into the lives of these musical geniuses and into several of the tracks on their latest album, which, by the way, you've got to pick up. 

L-R: Dwight Bosman, Hank Thompson, and Dwayne Bosman

Here's a look at how the conversation went:

Chapter 1. "We had to work at it hard." Before becoming one of the most accomplished jazz duos in St Louis, Dwight and Dwayne were raised in a musical household (0:00-10:15)

 - Track 3 - "Pootie"

Chapter 2. How do you raise talented children? "Give them the opportunity to fall in love with music." (10:15-21:30)

 - Track 8 - "My Daddy Was a Horn Player"

Chapter 3. A talented family. The Bosman Twins' mother worked for two governors and a president. Their sister performs poetry on one of their tracks - and she holds her own. (21:30-26:00)

Chapter 4.  What's it like for twins to record an album? "In the studio, time is money," explains Dwayne as Dwight makes faces behind his younger twin brother. (26:00-33:15)

 - Track 13 - "Tuned In"

Chapter 5. Progressive activism begets progressive music. The inspiration behind the music.  (33:15-39:00)

 - Track 9 - "When Lions Roar"

Chapter 6. Grammys bound! (technically). A walk through a few of the tunes on the album. (39:00-47:35)

 - Track 3 - "Pootie"

 - Track 6 - "Seclusion"

 - Track 12 - "DB Blues"

 - Track 1 - "Manifestation"

 

Hank and the guests occasionally mention an "Andy" through the course of the conversation, that would be KDHX volunteer engineer/producer, Andy Heaslet.

You can also catch guest host Hank Thompson on the air Sunday nights at 6pm on 88.7 WSIE.

*Get well soon, DJ Wilson!*

Dec 12, 2017

As described by his church, "The Reverend Starsky D. Wilson is a pastor, philanthropist and activist pursuing God’s vision of community marked by justice, peace and love. He is president & CEO of Deaconess Foundation, pastor of Saint John’s Church (The Beloved Community) and former co-chair of the Ferguson Commission."

To learn more about the ongoing work of the Ferguson Commission, now called "Forward Through Ferguson," check out this organization's impressive, dynamic report

Hank Thompson with Rev. Starsky Wilson

Here's a look at how the conversation went:

Chapter 1. Get to know Rev. Wilson and the causes he has been called to serve. (0:00-8:30)

Chapter 2. "I don't think much s going to happen... We're in St Louis." At first, Wilson didn't expect much to change following the death of Mike Brown. He would go on to serve as a co-chair of the Ferguson Commission. (8:30-18:30)

Chapter 3. "Kinda like apartheid, huh?" Laying the groundwork to move away from the minority rule of a majority population. (18:30-24:45)

Chapter 4.  "A terrific drive to be resilient." Thompson struggles with some of the philosophical differences within the black community. (24:45-32:00)

Chapter 5. "We put a lot into programs, but not into policy." Rev. Wilson helps walk Thompson through a systems analysis of building power for the black community to create a more equitable world.  (32:00-41:15)

Chapter 6. "We've all been on a learning journey." Articulating the difference between equity and equality and how Rev. Wilson came to recognize the difference. (41:15-50:30)

 

Like most weeks, Hank occasionally refers to an "Andy" through the course of the conversation, that would be KDHX volunteer engineer/producer, Andy Heaslet.

You can also catch guest host Hank Thompson on the air Sunday nights at 6pm on 88.7 WSIE.

*Get well soon, DJ Wilson!*

Dec 5, 2017

Ron Himes founded The Black Repertory Theater Company in 1976 and he continues to serve as the company's Producing Director.

Linda Kennedy has been an accomplished actor for 40 years, spending much of that time performing with the Black Rep. 

Get tickets for the next performance by calling the Box Office: 314-534-3810.

Hank Thompson Linda Kennedy Ron Himes

Here's a look at how the conversation went:

Chapter 1. "How do you compete with the instant gratification of social media?" asks Kennedy. Get to know the guests and the Black Rep. (0:00-10:15)

Chapter 2. "A responsibility to lead our audience." Director Himes discusses the Black Rep's place in the community. (10:15-18:45)

Chapter 3. Seeing yourself represented on stage. Every performance at the theater is different - and each show has the power to change a life. (18:45-25:00)

Chapter 4.  "The place to be on a Saturday night." More about the stages where the Black Rep has performed including Washington University's Edison Theater. (25:00-30:00)

Chapter 5. "What's your favorite production?" asks Hank. "Generally the next one," responds Himes. (30:00-36:45)

Chapter 6. How the St Louis Black Rep compares to its peers. Hint: Your presence is requested at the next performance. (36:45-45:15)

 

Hank refers to an "Andy" a handful of times in the course of the conversation, that would be KDHX volunteer engineer/producer, Andy Heaslet.

You can catch guest host Hank Thompson on the air Sunday nights at 6pm on 88.7 WSIE.

*Get well soon, DJ Wilson!*

Nov 28, 2017

This week on DJ Wilson's Collateral Damage, Hank Thompson and his guests tackle the difficult topic of sexual harassment and misconduct.

Dr. Malaika Horne, is the founder and Director of the Executive Leadership Consortium at the University of Missouri, St Louis (UMSL). The consortium seeks "to prepare students and a cross-section of career professionals to become effective leaders to meet current and future demands in response to regional, state, national and international needs."  

Art Perry is a retired pharmacist, current Democratic Committeeman for St Louis' 28th Ward, and he serves on multiple boards across the city.

Join the conversation and grow with Hank and his guests.

Here's a look at how the conversation went:

Chapter 1. "Citizen Busybody." Meet Dr. Horne and Mr. Perry and catch up on the context leading up to this conversation. (0:30-8:45)

Chapter 2. "I don't think most women were surprised." Rape culture is being exposed; we learn this behavior comes from the desire to dominate women. (8:45-20:00)

Chapter 3. "We hate that... that's what airhead men think." Hank poses a question and gets set straight, eventually noting, "To some extent, we're all guilty." (20:00-26:45)

Chapter 4.  "Now we have a voice." Women have never liked being sexually harassed, what's changed is the ability to make frustrations heard (26:45-34:30)

Chapter 5. You need all types. From boycotts to marches, there are a number of strategies being deployed to work towards a vision of equality before the law for black folks. (34:30-39:00)

Chapter 6. From protest to politics. While a new crop of political leaders are standing up for a more just local government, as Art Perry explains, citizens have been organizing to protect themselves for decades. (39:00-48:31)

 

Hank refers to an "Andy" a handful of times in the course of the conversation, that would be KDHX volunteer engineer/producer, Andy Heaslet.

You can catch guest host Hank Thompson on the air Sunday nights at 6pm on 88.7 WSIE.

*Get well soon, DJ Wilson!*

Nov 21, 2017

This week on DJ Wilson's Collateral Damage, Hank Thompson sits down with education activist Bill Monroe who shares decades worth of stories of shaking up the status quo.

In addition to an animated guest, we're trying a a couple new things this week. First, you may notice some smokey saxophone interludes - those are simply to break up the conversation a bit. Also, you'll notice that Hank will be calling this program "DJ Wilson's Collateral Damage." 

Here's a look at how the conversation went:

Chapter 1. "Brother! Brother! Don't Leave Me!" Monroe discusses the experiences that lead him to be an activist who wasn't afraid to literally fight back. (1:15-15:00)

Chapter 2. "Sounds like a good time to retire." Monroe made it through his time on the force with the help- and in spite-of his friend Marvin Boone. (15:00-27:15)

Chapter 3. Getting kicked out of the Stockley trial. (27:15-32:45)

Chapter 4. Marvin strikes again (literally again). Monroe got his friend a well-paying job and the friend got him fired - but it makes for a great story. (27:15-37:00)

Chapter 5. "Let me talk about Thurgood." Monroe sold his soul to try and set up one of the first charter schools in St Louis--then it was sabotaged. (37:00-45:30)

Chapter 6. "We've been poked, prodded, studied, and misdirected for a long time." Monroe isn't satisfied with that state of public schools in St Louis and he isn't done trying to make it better. (45:30-54:43)

 

Hank refers to an 'Andy' a handful of times in the course of the conversation, that would be KDHX volunteer engineer/producer, Andy Heaslet.

You can catch guest host Hank Thompson on the air Sunday nights at 6pm on 88.7 WSIE.

*Get well soon, DJ Wilson!*

Nov 7, 2017

Hank Thompson hosts Collateral Damage once again while DJ Wilson is away.

Guests this week are Rev. Dinah Tatman and Minister Donald Muhammad, leaders from the No Justice No Profits movement, a non-violent community action coalition seeking to gain equal justice under the law for African Americans across the St Louis community and, indeed, the world.

Learn more about the movement here:  https://www.nojusticenoprofit.us

Can a broad economic boycott of several major brands and economic centers like the Delmar Loop and the Galleria create the change that these religious leaders are calling for?

Here's how the conversation went:

0:00-13:00 - Framing the boycott: "How can we redistribute that pain?"

13:00-25:00 - "A volcano has erupted..." People have been galvanized, how the boycott can guide their actions.

25:00-29:00 - Implementation of "No Justice No Profits" in the pews.

29:00-35:30 - Who's being boycotted, who should be supported, and why. "You're asking people to turn their backs on their universe," protests Thompson. "You have to give yourself justice," responds Muhammad.

35:30-42:30 - "What should the Galleria do?" asks Thompson. "These are your power brokers" who can change policies, explains Muhammad.

42:30-55:15 - Speaking to the white liberal/progressive and wrapping up. "This is not a 'hate-white' movement, this is a 'love black' movement."

Rev. Tatman references a hit James Brown song with the lyrics, "I'm not looking for a handout. Just open the door, and I'll get it myself." Listen to it here.

 

Hank refers to an 'Andy' a handful of times in the course of the conversation, that would be KDHX volunteer engineer/producer, Andy Heaslet.

You can catch guest host Hank Thompson on the air Sunday nights at 6pm on 88.7 WSIE.

*Get well soon, DJ Wilson!*

Oct 31, 2017

Everyone at 88.1 KDHX is wishing DJ Wilson a speedy recovery from his illness.

****************

Alderwoman Heather Navarro was elected this July to fill the seat left open following Lyda Krewson's victory in the river city's mayoral election last spring.

Navarro, a licensed attorney, is also the Executive Director of the Missouri Coalition for the Environment, an organization that seeks to "educate, organize, and advocate in defense of Missouri's people and their environment."

Here's a look at how the conversation went:

0:00-6:30 - Introduction. "I don't know if anything can prepare you" for serving on the Board of Aldermen (BoA).

6:30-12:30 - Joining the BoA during a tumultuous time. "My role as a white person is to say 'Black Lives Matter'" and support the board's Black Caucus.

12:30-24:45 - Prop P. Navarro is glad the decision is ultimately in the hands of the voters.

24:45-25:45 - City-County merger.

25:45-28:45 - Public Education.

28:45-31:30 - Shrinking the BoA. Navarro serves on the legislative committee, the body who will decide how the new lines are drawn.

31:30-37:45 - What encourages Navarro? Passing a resolution calling on the city to get their power from 100% Renewable Energy certainly gives this environmentalist hope.

37:45-45:00 - Tax Abatements and wrapping up. "I have two dream jobs right now!"

You can catch guest host Hank Thompson on the air Sunday nights at 6pm on 88.7 WSIE.

Oct 24, 2017

Hank Thompson is back in the host's chair this week as DJ Wilson tackles some health issues. Check out Thompson's usual show, "Voices," Sundays at 6pm on 88.7 WSIE.

James Clark is the VP of Community Outreach for Better Family Life, a 31-year-old St. Louis-based organization looking "To establish social, cultural, artistic, youth, economic, housing, and educational programs that help promote positive and innovative changes in the lives of individuals and their families."

Clark navigates what he calls the "thick web of violence in our city," treating families' front porches as the front line in the struggle to end violence in St. Louis.

This community outreach professional keeps his phone on 24/7 and shares some of the stories that keep him up at night and the strategies that get him up and moving each morning.

One of those strategies is Peace Fest, coming up on Saturday Oct 28th 11am-8pm in Forest Park's Aviation Field.

Here's a look at how the conversation went:

0-11:15 - Why Better Family Life? "There's no problem that a strong black family can't handle," says Thompson. 

11:15-19:45 - Showing youth a better trajectory. There aren't brick-and-mortar or policy solutions to violence in our city streets.

19:45-25:15 - The neighborhood alliance model. Outreach workers go door to door within a specific "handprint" (don't say footprint) performing family assessments.

25:45-36:00 - Protests of police violence vs responses to street violence in our city. "They just came by and shot us," cried a young man to Clark during a late-night phone call.

36:00-47:30 - What can well-meaning white people do? Don't get stuck in "analysis paralysis," we know that poverty is the root of the problem.

48:00-55:53 - Peace Fest, "Packing Forest Park with peace loving people.

Oct 17, 2017

This week's guest host, according to DJ Wilson, "has the best voice in radio." Hank Thompson usually hosts the weekly show "Voices," Sunday evenings at 6pm on 88.7 WSIE, but this week he's also recording at the KDHX studios with guest Virvus Jones.

Jones, a frequent guest on Collateral Damage, and Thompson have known each other for years. This week's podcast is a front row seat for a lively conversation between two wise men who have been living and breathing St Louis history, politics, and activism for decades.

Guest host Hank Thompson with guest Virvus Jones

Here's a very rough look at how the conversation goes:

1:30-15:45 - What's up in St Louis... Jones: Police may say they own downtown streets, but they don't own the streets up in Walnut Park.

16:00-23:00 - How did we get here? A history of politics, voting rights, urban renewal (aka "black removal" according to Jones), and blight.

23:00-27:00 - Do single parent households have a role to play in the state of unrest? Thompson: "You've got to have standards," Jones: "You've got to have money!"

27:00-30:30 - What can change? Thompson: You paint a bleak picture, what can change? Jones: Stop the incremental BS.

30:30-41:15 - Prop P sales tax and more on newly appoint Director of Public Safety, Judge Jimmie Edwards. Jones references this piece in the St Louis American.

41:15-52:45 - Thompson: "I want to get something out of this though..." Jones offers some thoughts including initiatives implemented by his daughter (city Treasurer Tishaura Jones). PLUS: a great debate about the recent town hall with Mayor Krewson and Representative Bruce Franks.

Sep 26, 2017

In 2014, Valerie Dent lost her two youngest sons, ages 24 and 31, to gun violence. That same weekend, Edith Williams lost her great nephew. A few months later, her pastor asked her to help start a local chapter of Mothers in Charge.

Nationally, this organization is known as "a violence prevention, education and intervention-based organization, which advocates and supports youth, young adults, families and community organizations affected by violence."

Locally, Williams and Dent help grieving families cope when violent tragedies strike.

Get in touch via the St Louis Mothers in Charge Facebook page.

-------------------------------------------

Here's a look at how the conversation goes:

1:15-10:30 - Mothers in Charge in St Louis. The tough stories that brought Williams and Dent to this important work.

10:30-13:45 - Working with the police and how Mothers in Charge helps grieving families. 

 13:45-20:00 - "Structure to give back..." How Edith and Valerie make this work happen.

20:00-23:30 - "When I call them, I want them to show up..." more on working with the police.

23:30-27:00 - The nuts and bolts of reaching out to a grieving family.

27:00-32:30 - "Think before you react." "Retaliation needs to stop." The best ways to decrease violence. 

32:30-40:00 - "Show children love... and that they can trust you." Wrapping up and what gives Dent and Williams hope.

Sep 19, 2017

Here is a rough breakdown of how the conversation went.

 

Stockley Trial= 3:00-35:00

Amazon in St.Louis? = 36:35-42:00

Scottrade renovations= 42:01-45:00

Metro Link Crime= 45:22-49:22

Sep 12, 2017

For 15 years, four hours every morning, Lizz Brown woke up the St Louis region with her WGNU show, "The Wakeup Call."

The title of her talk radio program was more than a witty double entendre, it was a way of life for the firebrand host who wasn't afraid to declare that she was "liberal and lovin' it."

Adella Jones is a public information specialist who worked for the St. Louis Police Department and sometimes went toe to toe with the radio host while Brown was in her prime with "The Wakeup Call." Jones has since left the SLPD and now works in the private sector.

Jones and DJ Wilson are both full of respect and admiration for the radio personality who passed away on Sept 6, 2017 after battling cancer for some time.

 ---------------------------------

Here's a look at how the conversation went:

2:30-8:30 - Reporting from the back of a paddy wagon. Brown obviously talked the talk, but she walked the walk, too.

8:30-14:15 - A voice for North St. Louis. "The Wakeup Call" provided a voice for the otherwise unheard.

14:15-15:45 - Multiple dimensions. While Brown was known for her fiery on-air personality, she had some surprises in store.

15:45-23:30 - "She'd make you sharpen up your game..." Brown made local government better by holding them accountable.

23:30-37:00 - Media is lame now. Not only did Brown host her own show, she influenced the rest of the St Louis media market.

37:30-48:00 - "Talking releases pressure." No one is doing what Lizz did anymore... "disengagement is not to our advantage.

48:30-54:20 - Lizz at her best and the media landscape today.

Aug 29, 2017

Jeanette Mott Oxford is the executive director of Empower Missouri, an organization that "envisions Missouri becoming a more just, equitable and democratic society that assures every person’s health, safety, security, independence, human rights, dignity and the opportunity to reach full potential."

DJ and Jeanette's conversation follows Mott Oxford's career in politics, the work of Empower Missouri, and, of course, our state and nation's political climate.

 

Here's a look at how the conversation went:

0:00-15:00 - Who is J-MO and what does Empower Missouri do? "Why should workers live in poverty?"

15:00-22:00 - How does EmpowerMO help children and combat structural barriers to overcoming poverty? "It's in everyone's interest to solve housing and hunger."

22:00-28:15 - Toxic stress and kids. Some children are growing up with PTSD - what can we do about it?

28:15-32:00 - What's it like working with our state and federal representatives? Missouri is #2 in hunger and misconceptions are holding us back from making a change.

32:00-36:30 - EmPOWer Missouri's upcoming conference. POW stands for "Persisting in Organizing to Win."

36:30-40:30 - How has the MO house of representatives changed since J-MO left office? Mott Oxford's hope is in people, not party.

40:30-43:00 - Mott Oxford is a plaintiff in a lawsuit to prevent city funds going to support upgrades to the ScottTrade Center, something DJ has discussed with Cara Spencer (episode 108) and Fred Lindecke (episode 107).

43:00-49:00 - Why Trump is president and wrap-up. No president can just make things happen, that's why organizations like Empower Missouri are needed to advocate for change.

Aug 22, 2017

With the passing of comedian, civil rights activist, and cultural icon Dick Gregory, d.j. pays homage to the life of the St. Louis native, by reading excerpts of Gregory's 1964 autobiography, "nigger." Gregory attended Cote Brilliante elementary school, graduated from Sumner High School, and attended SIU-Carbondale before becoming a comedian. he was active in the Civil Rights struggle, and ran as a write-in candidate for president in 1968.  

Aug 15, 2017

What follows is a rough breakdown of how the conversation went down.

 

What inspired you to stat this academy? (3:00-8:00)

Soccer in STL (9:00-10:30)

The Field (10:40-13:00)

Youth Soccer in STL (14:00-17:30)

How to get a coach (17:45-19:00)

Why Soccer? (19:30-30:00)

Challenges of soccer (36:15-42:00)

Fifa Fair Play (42:10-47:00)

Popularity of the sport (47:00-49:30

How to get this field (49:45-66:00)

Aug 8, 2017

If the name Bosley rings a bell, that's because the new 3rd Ward alderman is the son of Freeman Bosley Sr. who served the third for 39 years. Brandon's brother served as the city's first black mayor from 1993 to 1997.

The young alderman was narrowly elected in April of 2017, inspired by the mobilization in Ferguson that showed Bosley that his community is ready for change. He wants to help find realistic ways to make that change happen.

Alderman Bosley with host DJ Wilson

Here's a look at how the conversation went:

0:00-16:00 - Who is the new Alderman Bosley? Where Brandon comes from, who he serves, what inspires him, and his governing philosophy.

16:00-19:15 - A divided community? Bosley discusses building realistic credibility in his neighborhoods.

19:15-26:45 - "Building our own blocks..." Tax incentives, the LRA, and alternative development models. 

26:45-31:30 - Understanding crime and the people who commit crime: Discussing a new police chief and the city workhouse.

31:30-35:00 - Alliances on the BoA? Dynamics at City Hall.

35:00-43:15 - The 3rd Ward: What Alderman Bosley's constituents (aka neighbors) are telling him.

43:15-48:30 - What's the role looking like four months in? What's next?

 

 Collateral Damage is hosted by veteran journalist Dennis (DJ) Wilson.

Aug 1, 2017

Kathleen Henry and Bruce Morrison from the Great Rivers Environmental Law Center join D.J. in the KDHX studios to discuss a variety of federal, state, and local environmental issues and what they mean to us here in the St. Louis region.

 

 

Here's a glance at how the conversation goes:

1:30-8:15 - What does the GRELC do and why?

8:15-21:00 - What does the Trump administration mean for the environment in St. Louis? Streamlining the development process isn't very good for Missouri and Illinois streams.

21:15-26:30 - How are things at the state level? What can the average citizen do to help? 

26:30-35:00 - What's going on closer to home? Development in St. Louis County parks, in particular, is not being done to promote outdoor recreation.

35:00-47:00 - Putting it all in perspective. Shifting from fossil fuels to renewable energy and seeing if there's any reason for hope.

Surprisingly, DJ ends on an optimistic note!

Jul 18, 2017

John Amman, SLU law professor, and Catherine Frizell, staff attorney for Children's Rights, discuss the federal class action suit against Missouri to stop the over-prescription of psychotropic drugs to the state's foster children.

Jul 4, 2017

Virvus Jones stopped by to speak with DJ about many issues facing the city of St. Louis, including crime, the budget, the national economy, the guaranteed annual income, and many other topics effecting the entire country on this episode of Collateral Damage.

4th of July : 3:00

VP Fair : 5:20

Gina Scott : 8:40

Veteran Life : 14:00

Housing : 20:00

Green Housing : 22:00

Universal Basic Income : 25:38

Crime : 33:30

City Budget : 36:55

Confederate memorial removal : 57:00

 

Jun 27, 2017

Daniel Durchholz from the St. Louis Post Dispatch stopped by the studio to share stories of what it is like to review music, how he believes people should behave at a concert, and a variety of tales from his decades covering music and doing concert reviews. 

 

The Riverfront Times (3:50)

Reviewing Music (4:35)

How to Prepare (11:30)

Note taking (13:00)

Set Lists (16:00)

Deadlines (17:25)

How to choose a concert to review (22:18)

Tom Petty (23:42)

Concert Etiquette (24:50)

Neil Young (34:10)

B.B. King (45:25)

Chris Cornell (49:00)

Worst Interviews (57:50)

Band you most want to see (61:40)

The Great Guns N Roses Riot of 91 (63:00)

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